Lindsay Mitchell

Lindsay Mitchell

Welfare: Violence made viable

Lots of people survive courtesy of a benefit. They do so because they are too sick to work, can't find a job, have children who need feeding with no other source of income, and so on. There are a myriad of reasons why people receive welfare. Most of these people - 300,000 or thereabouts - are not violent. The same can be said of the general population.


Lindsay Mitchell

The Folly that is Whanau Ora

This week, even Lyn Provost, the Auditor General who has presumably spent many, many hours putting together a report on Whanau Ora said, "It was not easy to describe what it is or what it has achieved." These outsider inabilities to understand the concept may not matter if insiders did. But there is now evidence that parties directly involved disagree about aims and purposes.


Lindsay Mitchell

Show us the "systematic discrimination"

Amnesty International makes pronouncements about every country in the world (in this particular report, 160 countries) but cannot intimately understand the development of child poverty locally. The only purpose this report serves is to provide headline fodder for the political Left.


Lindsay Mitchell

MSD ups efforts to detect sole parent benefit abuse

The trial applied to sole parent support beneficiaries because this is the only benefit that has relationship status a requirement for eligibility. The participants were those who had been on Sole Parent Support benefit for 20 weeks.


Lindsay Mitchell

ELECTION 2014: Where to with welfare?

In the last six years National has done more to address working-age welfare dependence than Labour did in the prior nine. However their reforms shouldn't be overcooked. Describing them as a "useful start" in his recent autobiography, Don Brash was spot on.


Lindsay Mitchell

Discussing Child Poverty in New Zealand

Authored by Jonathon Boston and Simon Chapple, Child Poverty in New Zealand was published on June 18, 2014. Two major reasons for child poverty are presented: Child poverty is a result of inadequate benefits, and Child poverty is the result of unemployment.


Lindsay Mitchell

Should New Zealand introduce time-limits on welfare?

Since the National government took office late 2008, welfare reform has formed a large legislative programme much of which has now been completed. It is perhaps too soon to expect benefit numbers to start reducing, complicated by the global financial crisis driving up unemployment in 2009-10.


Lindsay Mitchell

The politics of child poverty

Something about the way the Left is presenting the ‘child poverty’ problem doesn't stack up. When interviewed, Green co-Leader Metiria Turei repeatedly stresses that 2 in 5 of officially poor children come from working homes. But for Turei and other anti-poverty advocates to continually highlight this group when attempting to influence voters implies there is something less laudable about being benefit-dependent. Not a sentiment normally associated with the Left.


Lindsay Mitchell

Vulnerable Children Bill: Will it make a difference?

A recent Child Poverty Action Group report about child abuse claimed that, " ...the Ministry of Social Development and its predecessors have been researching and writing about child abuse for almost quarter of a century."


Lindsay Mitchell

National's welfare reforms - observations and assessment

In the early 1990s the National government introduced welfare reforms that were met with enormous resistance and provoked a good deal of public sympathy for the plight of beneficiaries. The reforms featured benefit cuts which reduced most incomes by around 10 percent, with some losing as much as 25 percent.